Monday, December 10, 2018

Nobody Knows What Five Star Ratings Mean. That’s Bad For Gig Workers.

In a San Francisco Lyft car, there's a chart taped to the back of the front passenger seat: "The Rating System Explained." It details — in exaggerated terms — what Lyft's one- to five-star rating scale really means to drivers. Beginning at five stars — "got me where I needed to go" — the explanations quickly descend into parodic paranoia. Four stars: "This driver sucks, fire him slowly ... Too many of these and I may end up homeless." Three stars: "This driver sucks so bad I never want to see him again." Two stars: "maybe the car had something dangerously wrong with it or he was doing 120 in a 40 mile zone." Caroline O'Donovan / BuzzFeed News One star? “Threats or acts of violence possibly made, perhaps a callous disregard for his own safety.” Though tongue-in-cheek, this rating system explainer touches on an essential truth of the gig economy: When companies like Lyft, Uber, and Postmates penalize workers who have low ratings, anything less than five stars feels like..

Chinese travellers are cutting up their United Mileage cards in anger

Oh boy. United Airlines is trending on Weibo, China's version of Twitter — but it's not pretty. On Monday, United forcibly removed an Asian man from a Chicago-Louisville flight. In disturbing footage, the security staff are seen struggling with the passenger, before he is removed from his seat and dragged down the aisle with a bloodied mouth. SEE ALSO: United's staff memo makes the internet even angrier—yes, that's possible The incident was top on Weibo on Tuesday, with the hashtag #美联航强制乘客下机# , or "United forces passenger off plane." Over 180 million users have engaged with the trending topic, and have collectively posted 890,000 comments. Read more... More about Airlines, Weibo, China, United Airlines, and Social Media

Stunning graphic novel shows aid workers fighting hunger and fear in South Sudan

Aid worker Leila Helal doesn't have an easy job. She's working with the World Food Programme in South Sudan, a country currently facing a Level-3 Emergency — the U.N.'s classification reserved for the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises in the world. Here's the catch: Leila is fictional, but the situation in South Sudan is anything but. The country is facing widespread hunger and pockets of famine caused by conflict and drought. SEE ALSO: New app lets you easily donate meals to Syrian refugee children for 50 cents This is where we enter Living Level-3: South Sudan, a new online graphic novel created by the World Food Programme (WFP) to spread awareness of the real-life crisis and the people, like Leila, trying to solve it. It's a form of storytelling the organization hopes will inspire empathy and help galvanize the international community into action. Read more... More about World Food Programme, Humanitarian Aid, South Sudan, Famine, and Refugee C..

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