Friday, March 23, 2018

Protester in viral photo embraces woman she defended from Islamophobic abuse

A viral photograph of a young woman smiling as she confronted the leader of the English Defence League (EDL) has become a symbol of resistance against the far-right. In the photo, Saffiyah Khan is seen standing up to EDL leader Ian Crossland during the far-right group's demo in Birmingham on Saturday. Moments before the photo was taken — by Press Association photographer Joe Giddens — Khan had stepped in when members of the EDL surrounded a young Muslim woman. SEE ALSO: British protesters think they've kept Trump out for a few more months Days after the photo was taken, Khan has met woman she defended, Saira Zafar, for the first time, and the two shared an embrace in a video by the Guardian. Read more... More about Resistance, Protest, Uk, Islamophobia, and Conversations

As a US strike group heads to the area, N. Korea says it will...

North Korea warned Monday it will reply to "reckless acts of aggression" by the USA, with "no matter strategies the US needs to take," as a US plane service strike group headed towards the Korean Peninsula.

People are trolling United Airlines with these brutal new slogans

If you've been anywhere near the internet in the past 24 hours, chances are you'll have stumbled across that disturbing viral video of the United Airlines passenger being forcibly dragged from his seat. SEE ALSO: Jimmy Kimmel rips into United Airlines with parody vid In the hours since, United Airlines has been at the centre of a media firestorm. Pretty much everyone on the internet seems to have temporarily put their differences aside in order to troll them. Twitter is no exception. Over the past few hours, people have been coming up with some new ideas for United Airlines slogans and sharing them with the hashtag #NewUnitedAirlinesMottos. Read more... More about Twitter, Mottos, Slogans, Hashtag, and United Airlines

Nobody Knows What Five Star Ratings Mean. That’s Bad For Gig Workers.

In a San Francisco Lyft car, there's a chart taped to the back of the front passenger seat: "The Rating System Explained." It details — in exaggerated terms — what Lyft's one- to five-star rating scale really means to drivers. Beginning at five stars — "got me where I needed to go" — the explanations quickly descend into parodic paranoia. Four stars: "This driver sucks, fire him slowly ... Too many of these and I may end up homeless." Three stars: "This driver sucks so bad I never want to see him again." Two stars: "maybe the car had something dangerously wrong with it or he was doing 120 in a 40 mile zone." Caroline O'Donovan / BuzzFeed News One star? “Threats or acts of violence possibly made, perhaps a callous disregard for his own safety.” Though tongue-in-cheek, this rating system explainer touches on an essential truth of the gig economy: When companies like Lyft, Uber, and Postmates penalize workers who have low ratings, anything less than five stars feels like..

Chinese travellers are cutting up their United Mileage cards in anger

Oh boy. United Airlines is trending on Weibo, China's version of Twitter — but it's not pretty. On Monday, United forcibly removed an Asian man from a Chicago-Louisville flight. In disturbing footage, the security staff are seen struggling with the passenger, before he is removed from his seat and dragged down the aisle with a bloodied mouth. SEE ALSO: United's staff memo makes the internet even angrier—yes, that's possible The incident was top on Weibo on Tuesday, with the hashtag #美联航强制乘客下机# , or "United forces passenger off plane." Over 180 million users have engaged with the trending topic, and have collectively posted 890,000 comments. Read more... More about Airlines, Weibo, China, United Airlines, and Social Media

Stunning graphic novel shows aid workers fighting hunger and fear in South Sudan

Aid worker Leila Helal doesn't have an easy job. She's working with the World Food Programme in South Sudan, a country currently facing a Level-3 Emergency — the U.N.'s classification reserved for the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises in the world. Here's the catch: Leila is fictional, but the situation in South Sudan is anything but. The country is facing widespread hunger and pockets of famine caused by conflict and drought. SEE ALSO: New app lets you easily donate meals to Syrian refugee children for 50 cents This is where we enter Living Level-3: South Sudan, a new online graphic novel created by the World Food Programme (WFP) to spread awareness of the real-life crisis and the people, like Leila, trying to solve it. It's a form of storytelling the organization hopes will inspire empathy and help galvanize the international community into action. Read more... More about World Food Programme, Humanitarian Aid, South Sudan, Famine, and Refugee C..

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